Tag Archives: welfare reform

Guaranteed Income The experiment that could end welfare

This article is from last year.

Evelyn Forget, May 1, 2016. Guaranteed Income: The experiment that could end welfare. albertaviews

albertaviews.ca/guaranteed-income/

Evelyn Forget writes about the Mincome experiment and its applicability for today.

The Canadian experiment with a GAI demonstrated its benefits: longer maternity leaves, better educational outcomes, better nutrition, better physical and mental health, less pressure on other social programs, no significant evidence that primary earners work less, and considerable evidence that the women and children who do work less spend their time in socially beneficial ways.

Hat tip to Candice for sending me the link.

Report: Working Without a Net: Rethinking Canada’s social policy in the new age of work

Two researchers from the Mowat Centre in Toronto have published a report on the future of Canada’s safety net, given current and likely future changes to the job market.

Sunil Johan and Jordann Thirgood: Working Without a Net: Rethinking Canada’s social policy in the new age of work.
webpage, pdf of actual report
(This is the report I linked to in the previous blog post.)

This report explores the implications of new technologies on Canada’s economy and labour market and the adequacy of current social programs and policies supporting workers. It proposes key considerations policymakers need to keep in mind as the nature of jobs evolves to ensure that they are designing policies that lead, and don’t lag, rapid changes to the nature of work.

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Creative Citizen, Creative State: The Principle and Pragmatic Case for a Basic Income

Anthony Painter is Director of the Action and Research Centre at the Royal Society of Arts in the UK. He makes a good case for basic income, then advocates introducing it incrementally. This is another talk at the basic income conference in Switzerland last spring. It’s only 18 minutes including Q&A.

Basic Income – Beyond Left and Right?

Today’s video is a panel of four economists at the conference in Switzerland in the spring of 2016, chaired by a journalist. The economists are Michael Tanner (USA), CATO Institute; Daniel J. Mitchell (USA), CATO Institute; Robert B. Reich (USA), UC, Berkeley; and Reiner Eichenberger (Switzerland), Ökonom. Moderation: Alexandra Borchardt (D), a German journalist.

The video is 45 minutes. Among other things, they discuss the loss of jobs to automation, the need for welfare reform, and issues around financing and implementation. The last 15 minutes they take questions from the audience. One tidbit: the smallest government spending (e.g. Hong Kong, Singapore) is about 20% of their GDP. Switzerland’s government spends 34% of their GDP; France’s government spends 57% of their GDP. (By my calculations Canada’s governments, all levels combined, spend a combined 25% of our GDP, but I could be wrong.) One of them asks if taxpayers in any of these countries are getting their money’s worth. How do you decide?

If you like this video, head on over to YouTube and give it a thumbs up. None of these videos are getting many views.